If the lovable and iconic Julia Child were with us on her birthday today, she would tell us she likes her peanut butter with corn chips.

She is most remembered for bringing French cuisine to the American public with her groundbreaking cookbook, “Mastering the Art of French Cooking.” Yet—foodies, bloggers and reporters who observed her when she was out of the limelight remember her affection for a beloved American food—peanut butter.

As a tribute to the great Julia Child and to all those who hold peanut butter in high esteem, we share some anecdotes with you.

  • In 2001, WGBH’s Boston reporter Emily Rooney interviewed Julia Child at her Cambridge home. Jared Bowen was the producer of the segment and shares this remembrance.

“My favorite anecdote from that day is what Child had for lunch as we departed. The queen of French cooking in America dined on a peanut butter and jelly sandwich with a side of Cheez Doodles. It’s that simple detail that is the reason why I will always be madly in love with Julia Child.”

  • It just so happened that Indian Chef and cookbook author Alamelu Vairvaran was scheduled to appear on the Discovery Channel’s “Home Matters” to promote her first cookbook, “Art of South Indian Cooking.” To her delight, Julia Child was a guest on the same show. Later, Vairvaran blogged about her excitement.

“This TV segment was titled:  ’In the Pantry With Julia Child.’   In this segment Julia Child was already 85 years old. The following suggestions and recommendations were made in that TV segment by Julia herself:

  • A key pantry item is peanut butter. One ingredient that no kitchen should be without is peanut butter.  Julia Child noted that instead of eating airplane food, she would rather eat a peanut butter- honey sandwich.
  • Use canola oil instead of tasteless vegetable oil.
  • Never refrigerate tomatoes.
  • Oil dressing with flake garlic is not good.
  • Use canned tuna in oil and not tuna in water.
  • Frozen green beans are like ‘dreary objects’.
  • Liked to mix sour cream and heavy cream for cooking.
  • Use vermouth instead of white wine in cooking since the former keeps better.”

Julia Child was with us for 92 years (Aug. 15, 1912-August 13, 2004) and would be 101 today. We at the National Peanut Board salute the wonderful Julia Child and the impact she’s had on our American food culture.

Now, celebrate with usgo eat a peanut butter and honey sandwich with corn chips.