Peanut Farming Yesterday and Today

a black and white photo of people harvesting peanuts with hoes.Jun 2, 2023

1700s
Oxen and horses for power, crude wooden plows, all sowing by hand, cultivating by hoe, hay and grain cutting with sickle, and threshing with flail

1797
Charles Newbold patents first cast-iron plow

Early 1800s

1819
Jethro Wood patents iron plow with interchangeable parts

1834
John Lane manufactures plows faced with steel saw blades

1837
John Deere and Leonard Andrus begin manufacturing steel plows; practical threshing machine patented

1840s
Factory-made agricultural machinery increases farmers’ need for cash and encourages commercial farming. First fertilizers sold commercially.

1847
Irrigation begun in Utah

1856
Two-horse straddle-row cultivator patented

Late 1800’s

1862-75
Change from hand power to horses characterizes the first American agricultural revolution

1865-75
Gang plows and sulky plows come into use

1868
Steam tractors are tried out

1869
Spring-tooth harrow for seedbed preparation appears

1890s
Agriculture becomes increasingly mechanized and commercialized

Early 1900s

1900-10
George Washington Carver of Tuskegee Institute finds new uses for peanuts, sweet potatoes, and soybeans, helping to diversify southern agriculture

1905
The first business devoted exclusively to making tractors is established

1910-15
Big open-geared gas tractors introduced in areas of extensive farming

1914
Smith-Lever Extension Act passed setting up a national extension farm service, still active today.

1918
Small prairie-type combine with auxiliary engine introduced

1920-40
Farm production gradually grows from expanded use of mechanized power

1930s
All-purpose, rubber-tired tractor with complementary machinery popularized

Late 1900s

1945-70
Change from horses to tractors and increasing technological practices characterize the second American agricultural revolution; productivity per acre begins sharp rise

1951
Organic chemicals are found to help protect plants against certain deficiencies

1954
Number of tractors on farms exceeds the number horses and mules for the first time

1970s
No-tillage agriculture popularized

1980s
More farmers use no-till or low-till methods to curb erosion

1989
After several slow years, the sale of farm equipment rebounds; more farmers begin to use low-input sustainable agriculture (LISA) techniques to reduce chemical applications.

1990s
Information technology and precision techniques increasingly used in agriculture

1994
Farmers begin using satellite technology to track and plan their farming practices. The user of conservation tillage methods, which leave crop residues in the field to combat erosion, continues to rise. Farm Bureau celebrates its 75th anniversary. U.S. Congress approves General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), helping liberalize world trade.

21st Century

2000-2016
Tractors guided by an internal GPS and a stored map of the field become prevalent, allowing for more precision, efficiency and cost savings.

Even though most U.S.A. peanut farms are family-owned and operated, today’s farmer integrates the latest in precision agriculture, crop and digital technology, new machinery and agricultural software to help manage the farming business.

Sources:

www.agclassroom.orggan/timeline/farm_tech.htm

http://www.answers.com/topic/agriculture-since-the-industrial-revolution#ixzz29P4eZ4vt

www.agriculture.com/news/technology

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